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NASIG 2021 has ended
Announcements:
  • Zoom details will be shared with registered attendees via email before the conference.
  • On-demand (pre-recorded) sessions will be available to stream the week of the conference. 
  • With the exception of Thursday’s Equity and Inclusion panel, all sessions are being recorded, and access details will be shared with registered attendees following the conference.
  • All virtual conference activity is subject to the NASIG code of conduct
  • Join us for conversations on the NASIG Discord server at https://discord.gg/uSyNkmxt
  • Leave feedback on the conference survey (deadline: June 11).
  • Presentation slides are available on our repository, provided by FigShare.

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Tuesday, May 18
 

4:00pm EDT

First-Timers Virtual Meet-Up
Is this your first NASIG conference? Are you interested in learning more about how the virtual conference will work? Are you interested in learning more about NASIG? If you answered yest o any of these questions, please feel free to come meet informally for an FAQ session with a few NASIG members to learn more about this year’s virtual conference and the organization.

Tuesday May 18, 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
Zoom Room #1
 
Wednesday, May 19
 

10:30am EDT

First-Timers Wednesday Drop-In
Wednesday May 19, 2021 10:30am - 11:00am EDT
Zoom Room #2

11:00am EDT

The Future of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Librarianship
What does the future hold in regards to DEI? Who are responsible? What needs to be done? When are we done? Or better yet, can we ever be done? Where are we going? Why are we here now? The mission of NASIG is about working to advance and transform the management of information resources. What steps have we taken to advance DEI? What transformative steps still need to be taken? What would it take to transform our profession to where DEI is embedded into everything? What resources and efforts are required? What needs to be discarded? What needs to be changed? How do we define success? How do we hold ourselves accountable? How do we fail forward? We are envisioning and working to create a world that doesn’t exist. Creating an inclusive, equitable, and welcoming future requires acknowledging a dark, painful, and traumatic past and present rooted in exclusionary standards and practices, foundations of white supremacy culture, settler colonialism, and more. I will begin to answer these questions in my talk and explain why I am cautiously optimistic about this work.

Speakers
TH

Twanna Hodge

Twanna Hodge (she/her) is the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Librarian at the University of Florida Libraries. She holds an MLIS from the University of Washington. Her research and professional interests include diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility issues and efforts... Read More →


Wednesday May 19, 2021 11:00am - 12:30pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

12:30pm EDT

Fiber Fun: Show and Tell
Drop by and share what crafting activities you've been working on, recent finishes, or plans for what you'll tackle next!

Zoom meet-up information is available in the Fiber Fun channel on the NASIG Discord server: https://discord.com/channels/824382698918772738/836292438199894046

Speakers
avatar for Erika Ripley

Erika Ripley

Head of Resource Acquisitions & Management, UNC-Chapel Hill


Wednesday May 19, 2021 12:30pm - 1:00pm EDT

1:00pm EDT

A Proactive Approach Towards Providing Seamless Access to E-resources
A Proactive approach towards providing seamless access to E-resources
This presentation illustrates proactive approach carried out by Electronic Resources Management (ERM) team at Arizona State University (ASU) Library, which has resulted into reduction of tickets volume from users during this unprecedented time. It will discuss about systematic process of handling various e-resources projects carried out by the team, challenges encountered, and share tips, which would assist institutions in providing uninterrupted access of E-Resources to their library users.

Speakers
avatar for Smita Joshipura

Smita Joshipura

E-Resources Librarian, Arizona State University
I am working as an E-Resources Librarian and Lead ERM team at Arizona State University Library. I have more than 30 years of rich experience working with Research, Academic & Public Libraries in India and USA. The goal of my professional career is to make information as accessible... Read More →



Wednesday May 19, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT
Zoom Room #2

1:00pm EDT

From the cradle to the digital vault: Tracking the path of e-journals
The ISSN International Centre has developed a suite of services for information professionals who want to identify digital journals and their publishers, and find out if these digital journals are being archived in a sustainable manner. The ISSN portal is the essential reference for obtaining controlled and updated metadata about digital continuing resources in reusable formats. Through the implementation of the ISO 3297 standard, a new version of which was published in October 2020, the ISSN International Centre and its network of more than 90 national centers identify about 50,000 new continuing resource titles each year and the ISSN database contains more than 2 million references to date. Building on this unique asset and on numerous partnerships, the ISSN International Center offers a service for tracking title transfers between publishers (journaltransfer.issn.org) and a service for reporting long-term archived titles (keepers.issn.org). This momentum will be continued as part of our 2024 Strategy, which will provide information professionals with identification services for publishers and organizations, as well as better tools to track URLs for online resources. The presentation will provide an overview of the current services and gather suggestions and opinions on our 2024 Strategy.

Speakers
avatar for Gaelle Bequet

Gaelle Bequet

Director, ISSN International Centre
Dr. Gaelle Bequet was appointed director of the ISSN International Centre in March 2014. She began her career as an ICT specialist with the French Ministry of culture and communication. She has further held leading positions in several academic libraries. Gaelle received a PhD in... Read More →


Wednesday May 19, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT
Zoom Room #3

1:00pm EDT

Publishing Scholarly Societies: One Library's Approach
The University of Minnesota (UMN) Libraries launched a library publishing program in order to provide an on-campus publishing service for UMN faculty members, and to help shift the larger publishing landscape. Library publishing is also one venue for libraries to financially support open access initiatives. In order to achieve a larger impact, the UMN Libraries Publishing expanded its service offerings to become the publisher of journals owned by scholarly societies. Taking on society publications presents unique opportunities and challenges for libraries. At UMN Libraries, this meant revising our business plan, adjusting our memorandum of agreement, creating new approaches to editorial training, and adjusting staff time spent on backfile and metadata remediation. Above all, accepting society journals means increasing the possibility of publishing existing journals, some of which were previously self-published by societies and some of which were published by other third-party publishers. Bringing on existing is further complicated by the need to, at least on some issues, shift expectations on what services library publishers can provide, these services might be considerably light if the journal was previously published through subscription access and had a revenue stream.

This presentation will break down elements of each opportunity and challenge and will argue for a more collective approach to libraries publishing.

Speakers
avatar for Emma Molls

Emma Molls

Publishing Services Librarian, University of Minnesota
I work with University of Minnesota Libraries to publish scholarly content in an open environment.



Wednesday May 19, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

2:20pm EDT

Sponsor Lightning Session #1
This session will include Lightning Talks from the following sponsors:

Duke University Press
AIP Publishing
IOP Publishing
Bloomsbury Digital Resources
JAMA Network
Springer Nature
ACS Publications


Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Steinle

Kimberly Steinle

Library Relations and Sales Manager, Duke University Press
avatar for Ken May

Ken May

Sales Manager, AIP
AIP Publishing lives by a promise to researchers: to ensure that all findings with the potential to advance the physical sciences are presented, promoted, and permanently available as the building blocks of future discoveries. We exist to connect our authors and readers to a living... Read More →
avatar for Hillery Pastovich

Hillery Pastovich

Regional Sales Manager, IOP
Hillery is the Regional Sales Manager for the Western US for IOP Publishing. Having started with IOP Publishing in late March 2020, Hillery has yet to meet any of her IOPP colleagues in person. Prior to IOPP, Hillery was the Business Manager for Emerald Publishing handling the same... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Robbins-Pollack

Andrew Robbins-Pollack

Bloomsbury
Launched in 2017 by Bloomsbury Publishing, the division is focused on providing essential and cutting edge scholarly content in the Humanities and Social Sciences, from primary documents, critical texts, historical archives or the latest in video and audio resources, we are committed... Read More →
NN

Natasha Nekola

Academic Sales Rep US and Canada, AMA
avatar for Robert Boissy

Robert Boissy

Director, Account Development, Springer Nature
I have had various roles in scholarly publishing since 2003, and fifteen years as a subscription agent before that. I have library degrees from the University at Albany and Syracuse University. I like to talk about cooperative marketing projects between libraries and publishers... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Clinton

Andrew Clinton

Marketing Manager, Community and Platform Outreach, ACS
ACS Publications is dedicated to helping researchers advance scientific excellence to solve global challenges through journals, eBooks, scientific programs, and the newsmagazine Chemical & Engineering News.


Wednesday May 19, 2021 2:20pm - 3:20pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

3:40pm EDT

New Developments for Journal Package Analysis and Data Visualization
The presentation can be downloaded through this link.

What metrics are most useful for comparing journal packages?What data visualizations enable the most insight into the value of these packages?
How can libraries produce these kinds of reports, including data visualizations, as efficiently as possible?

Over the last several years at Minnesota State University, Mankato, we have iteratively developed standardized reports for journal collection development, outreach, and academic program support. We previously presented an early version of our package-level analysis reports, where we focused on how to use Tableau for data visualization. Now, we will demonstrate new and improved reports, with new package-level and subject-level metrics leading to additional insights, and we’ll highlight why we prefer Python/ Jupyter Notebook for data visualization. We will also stress why it is important to develop package-level analysis and comparison capabilities beyond what can be provided by UnSub or the library management system.

In addition to talking about the applications of these reports for collection development, we’ll discuss how these reports contribute to a new liaison outreach project. The goals of this new project are (1) to re-affirm the value of the journal packages, (2) to prioritize them for continuing investment, and (3) to garner testimonials. Alongside ‘elevator speech’ versions of our reports, these testimonials can be shared with our university administration in order to drive home the importance of an adequate budget to support the curriculum and student success.

Speakers
avatar for Luwis Andradi

Luwis Andradi

Collection Management GA, Minnesota State University, Mankato
avatar for Nat Gustafson-Sundell

Nat Gustafson-Sundell

Collections Librarian, Minnesota State University, Mankato
My work is focused on collections and technical services, but I'm also an Art liaison with a particular interest in making stuff from appropriated images and text, and I have some background in Digital Humanities.Nat Gustafson-Sundell, MA, MLIS (any)Minnesota State University, Ma... Read More →
avatar for Pat Lienemann

Pat Lienemann

eAccess & Discovery Librarian, Minnesota State University, Mankato
JR

Jeff Rosamond

Minnesota State University, Mankato
avatar for Evan Rusch

Evan Rusch

Reference Librarian, Minnesota State University, Mankato
Evan (he/him/his) is Reference and Instruction Librarian, and Associate Professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato


Wednesday May 19, 2021 3:40pm - 4:40pm EDT
Zoom Room #3

3:40pm EDT

SILLVR: Streaming Interlibrary Loan Video Resources and Accessibility in Multimedia Content: Where did we come from, what are we, where are we going?
SILLVR: Streaming Interlibrary Loan Video Resources is an innovative initiative allowing libraries to ILL streaming videos for the first time. By leveraging relationships with local consortia (Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) and building partnerships with streaming video vendors, the Streaming Interlibrary Loan Video Resources (SILLVR) pilot launched in January 2020. This launch started just as the world saw the need for increased access to electronic resources as physical libraries and print materials were inaccessible for most. SILLVR demonstrates how vendors and libraries can work together to increase access to underfunded libraries and meet the needs of patrons. The SILLVR pilot continues in 2021 continuing to build on partnerships and build new ones. Attendees will learn about how SILLVR came to be, SILLVR workflows, and advice on how others can create their own SILLVR program.
---
Video and audio content are growing as a portion of scholarly output, and libraries are increasing the percentage of their budgets allocated to such resources. However, while there are some innately accessible aspects to these mediums, ensuring true accessibility by all who wish to access these resources doesn’t just happen. The existing accessibility requirements often don’t go far enough or have widespread uptake. This presentation will discuss the many kinds of accessibility that need to be addressed and their challenges; examples of today’s standards and guidelines and current efforts, such as the NISO working group, Assessing Video and Audio Metadata and Standards for Academic Research and Professional Information, to provide clarity and rigor; the ethical imperative as well as the business case for doing so (there are many other benefits, from increased discoverability to enhanced engagement); and some ideas about how the technology is pointing toward future accessibility milestones.

Speakers
avatar for Rachael Schoenbaum (she/her)

Rachael Schoenbaum (she/her)

Senior Software Engineer, Cadmore Media
Rachael is a senior software engineer with over 20 years of experience. She has worked in multiple industries, from medical to legal to non-profit to publishing, where she has spent the last 10 years. The bulk of her experience has been with the Microsoft stack and her focus is software... Read More →
avatar for Katy DiVittorio

Katy DiVittorio

Collections Strategies, Department Head, Auraria Library
avatar for Philip Gaddis

Philip Gaddis

Acquisitions and Interlibrary Loan Manager, Auraria Library, University of Colorado Denver
Philip Gaddis (MLIS, University of Denver) has worked in resource sharing and Interlibrary Loan for over a decade. Presently he serves as the Interlibrary Loan and Acquisitions Manager for the Auraria Library/University of Colorado Denver where he works as part of the team developing... Read More →
avatar for Neil Gilstrap

Neil Gilstrap

Chief Technology Officer & Co-founder, Cadmore Media


Wednesday May 19, 2021 3:40pm - 4:40pm EDT
Zoom Room #2

3:40pm EDT

Using Research to Expand the Transformative Agreement: A LYRASIS Case Study
In 2020, LYRASIS Research conducted a survey of our members to better understand predominantly United States (U.S.) institutional attitudes towards open content, including open access scholarship. The survey presented several findings indicating that U.S. institutions cannot conform to the same OA models and strategies as their international counterparts. The survey also indicated that a significant portion of U.S. institutions cannot participate in transformative agreements, at least in their current definition. The LYRASIS Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives team incorporated these findings into their negotiation strategies, most notably with their most recent Springer Nature renewal. This presentation will outline the findings of the survey, as well as their implications for future US OA initiatives. After reviewing the survey results, presenters will discuss LYRASIS’ most recent Springer Nature negotiations and their creative approaches to moving monetary resources from closed to open collections, first with the Duke University Press journal Demography, and then with OA ebooks centered around the United Nations Sustainability Goals. LYRASIS was able to introduce OA into their group’s negotiations in a way that encouraged and received participation from institutions of different sizes, missions, and research output, thus expanding the definition of the transformative agreement.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Grogg

Jill Grogg

Strategist, Content and Schol Comm Initiatives, LYRASIS
Jill Grogg is a Strategist with the Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives team at LYRASIS. Previously, she was electronic resources coorindator at The University of Alabama Libraries for over a decade.
avatar for Hannah Rosen

Hannah Rosen

Strategist, LYRASIS
Hannah Rosen is a Strategist for Research and Scholarly Communication at LYRASIS. Within the Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives team she is responsible for managing vendor and not-for-profit partnerships, including, but not limited to, digitization vendors, open access... Read More →


Wednesday May 19, 2021 3:40pm - 4:40pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

5:00pm EDT

Snapshots Session
Five-minute presentations by NASIG attendees  



Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Hess

Stephanie Hess

Electronic Resources Librarian, Binghamton University Libraries
Stephanie P. Hess has worked in a variety of Technical Services positions since 1998. She is currently the Electronic Resources Librarian at Binghamton University (SUNY) and possesses an extensive background in acquisitions, cataloging, collection development, and serials managem... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Goddard

Matthew Goddard

E-Resources Librarian, Iowa State University
Some things that interest me: -- strategies for providing a superior user experience -- systems design that empowers rather than infantilizes -- improving library-vendor relations -- discovery evaluation and assessment -- practical applications of randomness.
MH

Michaelyn Haslam

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
KA

Kelly A. Riley

Kent State University
avatar for Jamie Carlstone

Jamie Carlstone

Authority Metadata Librarian, Northwestern University Libraries
I am currently the Authority Metadata Librarian at Northwestern University. I've previously held positions in serials cataloging. I am interested in using coding to automate cataloging and metadata cleanup.
avatar for Erin Calhoun

Erin Calhoun

Electronic Resources Intern, University of Toronto Libraries
avatar for Kalvin Van Gaasbeck

Kalvin Van Gaasbeck

Electronic Resources Librarian, Santa Clara University
HT

Holly Talbott

Kent State University



Wednesday May 19, 2021 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Zoom Room #1
 
Thursday, May 20
 

10:30am EDT

First-Timers Thursday Drop-In
Thursday May 20, 2021 10:30am - 11:00am EDT
Zoom Room #2

11:00am EDT

Sponsor Lightning Session #2
This session will include Lightning Talks from the following sponsors:

DIGITALIA
De Gruyter
Our Research
OCLC
NISO
EBSCO
Oxford University Press

Speakers
avatar for Anne Campbell

Anne Campbell

Library Automation Manager, EBSCO
Forever on a mission to improve customer workflows using data standards and new ideas to solve old and new challenges.  Library Automation Manager at EBSCO since 2014.   I have served in a library technical services role since 1994, first with Blackwell North America, Blackwell... Read More →
avatar for Wyatt Reynolds

Wyatt Reynolds

Sales Representative, OUP
Oxford University Press (OUP) is the world's leading university press with the widest global presence. Our academic publishing programme serves scholars, teachers and researchers, publishing important and rigorous research and scholarship across subject areas stretching from History... Read More →
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491
avatar for Dave Celano

Dave Celano

Sales Director, Americas, De Gruyter
david.celano@degruyter.comDave is the Americas Sales Director at De Gruyter.
JP

Jason Priem

cofounder, Our Research
avatar for Xavier Claret

Xavier Claret

DIGITALIA


Thursday May 20, 2021 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

12:00pm EDT

Fiber Fun: Show and Tell
Drop by and share what crafting activities you've been working on, recent finishes, or plans for what you'll tackle next!

Zoom meet-up information is available in the Fiber Fun channel on the NASIG Discord server: https://discord.com/channels/824382698918772738/836292438199894046

Speakers
avatar for Rose Krause

Rose Krause

Eastern Washington University


Thursday May 20, 2021 12:00pm - 12:30pm EDT

12:30pm EDT

KBART Phase III: Changes and Unresolved Questions
KBART is one of the most successful NISO recommendations today. Formally supported by over 80 organizations across all stakeholder groups, it enables a standardized transfer of data between content providers and knowledge bases. Recently KBART added an automated process to transfer institution-specific holdings data to knowledge bases.

Now, the KBART Standing Committee is beginning work on Phase III of the KBART Recommended Practice, which has not been updated since 2014.

While KBART was originally designed to deliver journal and book holdings information in support of OpenURL link resolvers, KBART files are now used in multiple systems and by various stakeholders throughout the e-resource supply chain. In addition, content providers have moved beyond journals and books to deliver multimedia and non-book/non-journal content from around the globe.

In this session, members of the KBART Standing Committee will provide an overview of our plans around KBART Phase III, which is now underway. We will review our progress to date, highlighting our efforts to resolve thorny issues around KBART files for which there are no easy answers such as:
=> Challenges of supporting additional content types beyond serials and monographs
=> How best to handle gap coverage for serials
=> How to indicate open access content 

During the session, we will engage the audience by requesting feedback on a number of issues using an EasyRetro board, with the goal of keeping KBART relevant and valuable into the future.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Doellinger

Stephanie Doellinger

Senior Metadata Operations Manager CI & KB, OCLC, Inc.
Stephanie Doellinger is a Senior Metadata Operations Manager at OCLC. Over her 10-year tenure, she and her team have worked with both publishers and libraries to manage the processing and validation of e-resource metadata which make up the WorldCat knowledge base and Central Index... Read More →
avatar for Noah Levin

Noah Levin

Co-Chair NISO KBART Standing Committee, NISO KBART Standing Committee
Noah Levin is the Co-Chair of the NISO KBART Standing Committee and a member of the KBART Automation Working Group. Noah has spent the last 20 years designing and creating metadata workflows for large Academic and Trade Publishers; managing their Link Resolver/Discovery data, MARC... Read More →
AJ

Andree J. Rathemacher

Professor Librarian, University of Rhode Island
Andrée Rathemacher is Head of Acquisitions at the University of Rhode Island, where she administers the materials budget and is responsible for the purchase and licensing of library materials in all formats and the management of electronic resources. She is currently the co-Chair... Read More →



Thursday May 20, 2021 12:30pm - 1:30pm EDT
Zoom Room #2

12:30pm EDT

Physical-Equivalent Privacy and The Ever Changing Yet Same Privacy Landscape: Challenging Circumstances and Possible Paths for Consideration
Despite its public and vocal commitment to patron privacy, librarianship largely lacks functional ways to assess privacy with respect to third-party resources such as vendor-provided e-resources. "Physical-equivalent privacy" can be one such yardstick: establish what data is collected, analyzed, stored, and shared/sold when patrons interact with an e-resource, then work out what would have to happen to collect equivalent data about use of an information-equivalent physical resource. If the data practices around the physical resource would be too unethical to countenance, then -- as a matter of service equity and inclusion -- so are the online data practices. The presentation will put this yardstick into practice with real-world examples, including the 2014 Adobe data leak and the under-construction Seamless Access proposal for e-resource authentication, so that attendees can use the yardstick themselves afterward.
---
On any given day, the headlines offer up another story of egregious privacy practices by a commercial entity monetizing user data without consent or even justification. Librarians can’t help but be concerned about the tools and services that they rely upon and provide to users. Are we just one headline away from being the story of the day? Ethically, privacy should be a factor in every decision made around library services and the provision of resources. With staffing stretched to the breaking point, and only more so as a result of the pandemic what strategies and tools could best help libraries ensure good privacy practices. This panel will draw upon current scholarship, grant projects, and policy making in librarianship to highlight ways that librarians are engaging with these important issues. For example, Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe is leading the charge to develop a model privacy license language that libraries can utilize in their vendor negotiations and leading a project for academic librarians to champion privacy in campus learning analytics projects.. Doreen Bradley and Heather Staines have co-edited a special issue of Serials Librarian that explores privacy concerns that range from third party services, to data privacy, to tracking, and more. Gabriel Gardner of California State University Long Beach who contributed to the special issue will address concerns around third party tracking. In this session, participants will talk about the latest concerns and what you might do in your library to assure your faculty, staff, and students that their privacy is front of mind.

Speakers
avatar for Doreen Bradley

Doreen Bradley

Director of Learning Programs and Initiatives, University of Michigan Libraries
I lead the Learning Programs & Initiatives group within the University Library and represent the library on campus instruction initiatives. In these efforts, I work collaboratively with library instructors and faculty across campus to further information literacy programs. I lead... Read More →
avatar for Gabriel J. Gardner

Gabriel J. Gardner

Librarian / Discovery Coordinator, California State University Long Beach
avatar for Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe

Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, UIUC
avatar for Dorothea Salo

Dorothea Salo

Distinguished Faculty Associate, Information School, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Salo teaches organization of information, library technology, scholarly communication and library publishing, and research-data management for the ALA-accredited iSchool at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is also a librarian specializing in research-data management, digital... Read More →
avatar for Dr Heather Ruland Staines

Dr Heather Ruland Staines

Independent Consultant, Independent Consultant
The future of scholarly communications, anything open, digital preservation, journal transfer, karaoke and dogs!


Thursday May 20, 2021 12:30pm - 1:30pm EDT
Zoom Room #3

12:30pm EDT

Towards More Equitable, Diverse, and Inclusive Representation in Metadata and Digitization: A Case Study
In August 2020, the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries created a plan to implement policies for equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI). As part of this initiative, the Libraries established several committees with varying purposes. The presenters for this proposal serve on the EDI Committee for Metadata and Digitization, whose goal is to evaluate and revise biases in metadata and digital representation at UTA Libraries. The members of this committee include archivists, librarians, and metadata specialists from the library’s special collections, digital creation, and access and discovery departments. By identifying the need for greater and more accurate representation of diverse groups, we seek not only to assure the ethical and equitable use of metadata, but also to enhance the accessibility and discoverability of those resources in our library catalog and digital collections.

This presentation details our committee’s process of assuring current and continuing equitable, diverse, and inclusive representation in technical services and digitization. The presentation will follow the phases of this project, from the committee’s initial objectives to its plan for continuing evaluation and revision of metadata and digitization practices. We begin this presentation by detailing how the committee first identified and established specific goals. We then examine the ways in which we undertook the widespread evaluation of the Libraries’ existing metadata and materials in our digital collections. We discuss how we created a plan for the revision of metadata and the prioritization in digitizing materials from our physical collections that highlight diverse voices and populations. We examine our creation of a system of measurements to track the outcomes of our tasks and the progress towards meeting our committee’s intended purpose. We then outline the methods we have adopted to assure the continued efforts towards greater and more accurate representation in our metadata and digital gallery. To conclude the presentation, we will give examples of lessons learned as well as steps moving forward within this committee, including updates to the library’s LibGuides and digital repository.

Many libraries have worked toward increasing awareness and implementing policies to increase visibility of diverse voices, populations, and cultures, and this presentation offers a case study on how UTA Libraries has handled their own initiatives. We hope to show our process for reviewing and correcting inequitable metadata as well as prioritizing digitization of materials in physical collections related to underrepresented groups. We believe that by sharing our committee’s efforts toward more equitable, diverse, and inclusive representation, we can encourage more information professionals to work towards implementing similar improvements at their institutions.

Speakers
SL

Stephanie Luke

University of Texas at Arlington
SP

Sara Pezzoni

University of Texas at Arlington
WR

Whitney Russell

University of Texas at Arlington



Thursday May 20, 2021 12:30pm - 1:30pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

1:50pm EDT

Equity and Inclusion Panel
We all like to consider ourselves helpful people, but are we always quick to lend a hand whenever the opportunity arises? This panel discussion will focus on bystander intervention approaches within the context of academic libraries. What strategies and resources are available? What do we look for and how do we combat a situation? When do you call someone out or in? The panelists will center on how one can become an active mediator through sharing their experiences and thoughts on bystander intervention approaches.

*This session will not be recorded for later viewing.*

Speakers
avatar for Moon Kim

Moon Kim

Acquisitions Librarian, Ohio State University
avatar for Kristen Twardowski

Kristen Twardowski

Library Sales Manager, U.S. and Canada, Duke University Press
Kristen Twardowski is the current Vice-Chair for NASIG's Equity & Inclusion Committee. She is also the Library Sales Manager for the U.S. and Canada at Duke University Press's and is eager to talk about e-books, open access, and equity and inclusion.
avatar for Treshani Perera

Treshani Perera

Music and Fine Arts Cataloging Librarian, University of Kentucky Libraries
Treshani Perera (she/her) is the Music and Fine Arts Cataloging Librarian at the University of Kentucky, and also serves as the head of the Fine Arts Cataloging Unit. Treshani provides original and complex copy cataloging for all formats in the Fine Arts Library, oversees preservation... Read More →


Thursday May 20, 2021 1:50pm - 2:50pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

2:50pm EDT

Ice Cream Break
Thursday May 20, 2021 2:50pm - 3:30pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

3:30pm EDT

Born Accessible: Creating Templates for Standardized, Accessible ETDs
As universities develop graduate degree programs or move toward the adoption of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs), a need arises to create a document template which satisfies program requirements, supports backend workflows for ingestion into an institutional repository, and offers an accessible, intuitive formatting guide for student authors. At the University of Southern Indiana, the library worked with the Education department to develop a dissertation template for a new Doctor of Education program. Inspired by an ETD template from the Ohio University College of Education, we built the dissertation template to not only standardize formatting for student convenience, but with updated layout and built-in accessibility to create a digital-first document that will be accessible to all readers who access the final ETDs in the repository. The library then developed three thesis templates (APA, MLA, and Chicago style) for existing masters programs. To ensure document accessibility, we adhered to WCAG 2.1 success criteria (when possible within Microsoft Word) as a point of departure and supplied additional keyboard shortcut paths in situations where menu or process navigation seemed overly cumbersome for users navigating the document without the use of a mouse.

This hands-on workshop will walk attendees through how to create their own templates using advanced Microsoft Word formatting features and best practices in accessibility and UX design. Attendees who have never considered accessibility best practices for document creation will learn techniques which will be immediately applicable to their own documents and communications. More experienced participants will gain insights into accessibility concerns specific to dissertations and theses, as well as having time to develop templates for their own institutional needs. Access will also be provided to USI’s four existing ETD templates released under a CCO license.

Speakers
BN

Becca Neel

Assistant Director for Resource Management & User Experience, University of Southern Indiana
AW

Andrea Wright

United States Air Force Academy


Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 4:30pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

3:30pm EDT

Measuring Collection Diversity Via Exploratory Analysis of Collection Metadata
As libraries increasingly make explicit their commitments to diversity, equity and inclusion (EDI), it is critical to measure how well collections support these mandates, as well as identify areas for improvement. By approaching metadata as a data source that can be studied, rather than solely as descriptors about library materials, we can expand our capacity for self-reflection, and support our missions around EDI.
This session will begin with an overview of the MARC fields that may be the best choices to investigate when asking diversity-related questions. Attention will be paid to useful tips to consider when starting and structuring an exploratory analysis, before jumping into an example analysis. The bulk of the presentation will focus on useful technical tools for extraction and cleaning of data, based off of an analysis ran on metadata from the University of Toronto Libraries. This analysis examined over 2.8 million geographic subject headings (field 651 subfield a), as one surrogate measure for diversity. Tools used included the ILS API for data extraction, as well as the UNIX shell and python for data cleaning and analysis. Alternative tools will be presented for varying levels of technological comfort, and I will share my scripts for audience members to reuse in their local contexts as they see fit.
The session will finish with a discussion of possible implications of such studies, such as identifying whether gaps lay in metadata or in acquisitions policies, as well as best ways to communicate results.

Speakers
avatar for Jordan Pedersen

Jordan Pedersen

University of Toronto Libraries



Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 4:30pm EDT
Zoom Room #2

3:30pm EDT

The OA Switchboard: How a simple, collaborative solution tackles multiple use cases for funders, institutions and publishers, strategically and practically
Open Access (OA) output is growing year-on-year and there is widespread belief that research will function better if results are made openly available to the community.

Managing the increasingly complex network of agreements between publishers and institutions, along with the rise in number of policies associated with open access publications by academic institutions and funders poses a serious implementation challenge. As consequence, policies are not always effectively implemented and agreements not realised to the full.

This complexity, and the current administrative burden on institutions, funders and publishers, has also hindered progress in developing new business models to support a broader move to OA. From a researchers perspective, this landscape is at best confusing, and at worst impenetrable.
For a breakthrough in the transformation of the market such that OA is supported as the predominant model of publication, a joint challenge has to be addressed: the complexity around the implementation of multi-lateral OA publication-level arrangements.

The OA Switchboard contributes to the solution as a neutral, independent intermediary,
providing shared infrastructure, standards and back office services for funders, institutions and publishers. It is a tool that can be called when needed, or integrated in stakeholders’ own systems and workflows to achieve automation and scalability, as it facilitates interoperability with other systems in the OA workflow.

Following a successful 2020 project, overseen by OASPA, the OA Switchboard moved to the operational stage as of 1 January 2021, and is now run from the newly founded Stichting OA Switchboard. This structural governance and funding model ensures a not-for-profit, collectively controlled collaboration between funders, institutions and publishers, whereby neutrality and independence are preserved by legal structure, governance and articles of incorporation.

2021/2022 is regarded as a ‘launch phase’ to achieve wide adoption and widespread usage, to allow time for (technical) integration and implementation, and to further develop and improve the OA Switchboard. As we speak, participating publishers, research institutions and funders, sometimes joined by partners who provide specific systems or solutions for them, are defining use cases between them to get started with. This shows how this simple solution can be used to tackle multiple use cases. These early adopters, launching customers and founding partners meet regularly to discuss strategic, as well as (shared) implementation topics.

In this 45 minutes session at the NASIG 2021 conference, we want to share these conversations and engage a wider community. This is the agenda:

Context & Setting – Yvonne Campfens
Funder challenges & 2021 use case
Library/institution challenges & 2021 use case - Liz Ball and Jennifer Sanchez-Davies (Jisc)
Publisher challenges & 2021 use case - Alex Howat (Microbiology Society)
OA Switchboard: Reporting Made Easy - Ádám Dér (Max Planck Digital Library)
Q&A and discussion with audience – moderated by Yvonne Campfens

Speakers

Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 4:30pm EDT
Zoom Room #3

4:45pm EDT

Member Forum
Business Meeting
  1.  Call to order
  2. Highlights from the past year, presented by Betsy Appleton
  3. Financial report, presented by Cris Ferguson
  4. Introduction to the 2021-2022 Board, presented Xiaoyan Song (Nominations & Elections Committee Chair)
  5. Recognition of outgoing Board members and committee chairs, presented by Vanessa Mitchell (Awards & Recognition Committee Chair)
  6. Strategic Directions Discussion, presented by Betsy Appleton
  7. Discussion of old business
  8. Call for new business





Thursday May 20, 2021 4:45pm - 5:45pm EDT
Zoom Room #1
 
Friday, May 21
 

7:00am EDT

Ramble
NASIG 2021 Ramble! The NASIG Fun Run is now officially the NASIG Ramble! We invite you to move in any way you desire - walk, jog, run, skip, hop, ride, roll, row, swim! Go any distance on your favorite route/location any time during the conference, May 17-21, 2021. We may not be able to gather in person, but we can still ramble in our favorite places and experience it together virtually. Simply join our event on the NASIG Facebook page and if you’d like, post and share photos from your ramble.

We hope you will join us! #NASIG2021ramble

If you’re so inclined, please also join Librarians who Run FaceBook group!

Friday May 21, 2021 7:00am - 10:00am EDT
NASIG Ramble

10:30am EDT

First-Timers Friday Drop-In
Friday May 21, 2021 10:30am - 11:00am EDT
Zoom Room #2

11:00am EDT

Vision Session: Friday
Speakers

Friday May 21, 2021 11:00am - 12:15pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

12:15pm EDT

Fiber Fun: Show and Tell
Drop by and share what crafting activities you've been working on, recent finishes, or plans for what you'll tackle next! Wendy will show off her quarantine dying (as in color) experiments!

Zoom meet-up information is available in the Fiber Fun channel on the NASIG Discord server: https://discord.com/channels/824382698918772738/836292438199894046

Speakers
avatar for Wendy Robertson (she/her)

Wendy Robertson (she/her)

Institutional Repository Librarian, University of Iowa
Wendy Robertson, Institutional Repository & Metadata Librarian has worked as a librarian at The University of Iowa Libraries since 2001. Her previous work positions include Electronic Resources Systems Librarian in Enterprise Applications, Electronic Resources Management Unit Head... Read More →


Friday May 21, 2021 12:15pm - 12:45pm EDT

12:45pm EDT

Student Spotlight Sessions
Our Student Spotlight this year will feature two students speaking about their internship experiences.

Cody: The Learning Accountability Program (LeAP): A Description of a Grassroots Continuing Education Program



Speakers
avatar for Cody Hackett

Cody Hackett

Senior Electronic Resources Specialist, Georgetown University
SS

Sherri Schon

Acquisitions and Discovery Intern, North Carolina State University


Friday May 21, 2021 12:45pm - 1:45pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

2:05pm EDT

Ensuring Continuity of Access: Best Practices in Digital Preservation and Content Transfer and Heeding the Call: Finding At-Risk Electronic Titles in University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Hawaiian Collection
Loss of access to content not only harms the scholarly record but significantly hinders research efforts. Whether temporary or permanent, the threat of content loss can be mitigated by technology, standards, and education for all stakeholders. Digital preservation, particularly for non-APC funded open access journals, is critical to ensure against content loss. Journal content regularly shifts from one publisher to another or one hosting platform to another, changes which might be expected to increase in frequency as journals look to new funding models. Each of these changes increases the prospect that libraries and researchers might lose access to vital material necessary to their ongoing work. Join us for insight into challenges that might disrupt access to content and learn how you might get involved in initiatives working to ensure ongoing access.
---
Libraries rely heavily on their electronic collections during this period of global pandemic. Even before the pandemic, libraries’ attention and allocations moved towards electronic access. Ensuring continued access becomes a key concern for libraries. At the NASIG 2020 conference, Tavernier and Westervelt called on librarians to identify at-risk titles in their collections and work toward mandating digital preservation, using ISSN’s Keepers Registry as a key resource to track digital keepers and holdings. We heeded that call for our core titles in the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library’s Hawaiian Collection, a comprehensive collection of retrospective and current materials pertaining to Hawaiʻi. The titles we chose reflect both the diversity of Hawaiʻi, but also a range of publication and distribution methods. This presentation covers the process to identify the preservation status of these vital research resources, determine the titles at risk, and make preservation decisions. In addition to helping us locally plan, we see how these core titles relate to other keepers and other collections. This context provides insight into who else collects and maintains our unique journals.


Speakers
NB

Narine Bournoutian

Head of Continuing Resources and Collection Maintenance, Columbia University Law Library
AJ

Amy J. Carlson

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library
JM

Jodie Mattos

Hawaiian Collection librarian, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library
avatar for Dr Heather Ruland Staines

Dr Heather Ruland Staines

Independent Consultant, Independent Consultant
The future of scholarly communications, anything open, digital preservation, journal transfer, karaoke and dogs!


Friday May 21, 2021 2:05pm - 3:05pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

2:05pm EDT

Reevaluating and Strengthening Publishing Partnerships Between Librarians and Researchers
Recent studies in scholarly publishing show the academic publication lifecycle continues to undergo major changes. Perhaps the most significant change is that the publication process is no longer linear. Rather, the publication process has become more circular – a series of loops and connections, with some action steps repeated multiple times. Researchers, publishers, and academic librarians have all adapted their roles in response to the circular publication lifecycle, and over the past several years, these roles continue to change amidst the challenges presented by Open Access publishing, exorbitant subscription costs, transformative agreements, and other issues. Despite these challenges, however, the circular publication process represents multiple opportunities for librarians and researchers to build increasingly collaborative partnerships charged with moving authors from idea to publication. During this session, we will explore these opportunities further by examining several potential, unique methods for librarians and researchers to work collaboratively at any number of steps in the publication process. In addition to sharing collection prioritization tips and scenarios in which librarians may discuss publishing goals with researchers, we will also discuss training models in which librarians assist tenure-track faculty with other facets of the publication process beyond data access and discovery.

Speakers
avatar for Drew Balduff

Drew Balduff

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Findlay
avatar for Christine Tulley

Christine Tulley

Director of MA in Rhetoric and Writing, The University of Findlay
Christine Tulley is Professor of English and Founder and Director of the Master of Arts in Rhetoric and Writing at The University of Findlay. As the campus Academic Development Coordinator, she runs faculty writing groups and offers tenure and promotion application support within the library including effective practices for writing teaching philosophies and persuasive reflective statements... Read More →


Friday May 21, 2021 2:05pm - 3:05pm EDT
Zoom Room #3

2:05pm EDT

What You Can Do to Help Promote Transparency in Discovery and Why
NISO recently updated the Open Discovery Initiative Recommended Practice (https://www.niso.org/publications/rp-19-2020-odi), which outlines best practices for working with library discovery services. It defines ways for libraries to assess the level of content provider participation; streamlines the process by which libraries, content providers and discovery service providers work together; defines models for “fair” linking; and suggests usage statistics that should be collected for libraries and for content providers. The recommendations in this document, created by members of the Open Discovery Initiative Standing Committee, enable libraries, discovery service providers, and content providers to work together to the full extent of their abilities—providing the most effective and rich experience to end users.

In this presentation, you will learn about the Open Discovery Initiative, what changes were included in the 2020 revision of the ODI Recommended Practice, and delve more deeply into several areas: free-to-read content, fair linking, and the key elements included in the newly added library conformance statements.

You will also learn from a library and publisher perspective of concrete steps you can take to achieve conformity as well as ways to fine tune your processes for increased discoverability of your content.

The publisher perspective will demonstrate what content providers do to conform to the ODI recommendations:
-conduct internal projects to improve metadata and data delivery mechanisms;
-collaborate with discovery service, link resolver and authentication vendors to improve indexing, linking, authentication and reporting;
-work with libraries to guide and troubleshoot configuring library discovery service, link resolver, and authentication tools for subscribed content;
-participate in industry activities to create, update and promote best practices;
-examine and conduct steps to conform to ODI I and ODI II recommendations.

The library perspective will demonstrate how to complete a conformance statement, how to work with discovery and content providers on improving discovery and access, and we will touch on authentication tools for subscribed content.

Speakers
avatar for Teresa Hazen

Teresa Hazen

Department Head, The University of Arizona
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Senior Manager, Discovery Partners, IEEE
Julie Zhu cultivates and manages effective working relationships with Discovery Service, Link Resolver, Proxy Service and Search Engine providers to maximize IEEE content findability, visibility and accessibility in multiple discovery channels. She serves in NISO’s Information Discovery... Read More →


Friday May 21, 2021 2:05pm - 3:05pm EDT
Zoom Room #2

3:25pm EDT

Does Artificial Intelligence (AI) Have a Role in E-Resources Licensing?
Many Electronic Resource Librarians (ERL) review and negotiate contracts and must balance this work with other time-sensitive activities. Electronic resource license review and negotiation is a complex undertaking due to the concurrent demands of an expedient initial review and the negotiation process itself that can take several months to complete. In addition, developing adeptness in understanding legal concepts and contract language is a long-term commitment as license content continues to change. The main challenge in many libraries arises from the high volume of contracts that often bear little resemblance to one another. There are some popular approaches to contract review that involve iterations of checklists, but is there s more efficient way to review these documents? Can AI contract review software help expedite the review process for libraries? If so, how accurate is the review? Since 2019, The Florida Virtual Campus/Florida Academic Library Services Cooperative began a three-year pilot using AI software (LegalSifter) to review agreements. This presentation will cover to what extent has the software influenced the content of the contract to include favorable terms; how problematic terms are flagged in agreements; and how consistent are these executed agreements. We will also explore the efficacy of using the software to train those new to reviewing and negotiating electronic resource licenses. Limitations of using AI contract review software will also be discussed.

Speakers
RE

Rachel Erb

Direct of E-Resources, Florida Virtual Campus/Florida Academic Library Services Cooperative


Friday May 21, 2021 3:25pm - 4:25pm EDT
Zoom Room #2

3:25pm EDT

Don't Wait, Automate! Industry perspectives on KBART Holdings Automation
When trying to manage their electronic resources, librarians spend a significant amount of time in vendor knowledgebases to make sure that content is integrated properly. This is often a tedious and painful process, which--extrapolated out to each content provider--can be a drain on library resources. Thankfully, there is a way to mitigate this pain point, through the use of KBART automation. By using a NISO Recommended Practice, librarians can now have publishers transfer their institutional holdings information directly into vendor knowledgebases. The result is no more messy and time-consuming manual title management.

In this session, we'll hear from those involved with enabling KBART automation at the publisher and vendor level. This will specifically detail the work required to actually make this happen. The case will also be made for library adoption of this feature and how it will help end library headaches related to electronic resources management once and for all. There will be time for questions at the end to discuss the benefits and pitfalls of KBART automation. This session is co-sponsored by the NASIG Standards Committee.

Speakers
AJ

Andree J. Rathemacher

Professor Librarian, University of Rhode Island
Andrée Rathemacher is Head of Acquisitions at the University of Rhode Island, where she administers the materials budget and is responsible for the purchase and licensing of library materials in all formats and the management of electronic resources. She is currently the co-Chair... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Doellinger

Stephanie Doellinger

Senior Metadata Operations Manager CI & KB, OCLC, Inc.
Stephanie Doellinger is a Senior Metadata Operations Manager at OCLC. Over her 10-year tenure, she and her team have worked with both publishers and libraries to manage the processing and validation of e-resource metadata which make up the WorldCat knowledge base and Central Index... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Ragucci

Matthew Ragucci

Associate Director of Product Marketing, Wiley
I am Wiley's resident librarian and provide insight on metadata sharing strategies for optimizing its electronic resources for discovery, access, and usage. This includes working closely with librarians and library solutions providers alike to get the tools they need to help the end-user... Read More →



Friday May 21, 2021 3:25pm - 4:25pm EDT
Zoom Room #1

3:25pm EDT

Unsub in real life: using Unsub as part of serials decisions and negotiations
Unsub is a collections analysis tool that helps libraries understand and forecast the value of their serials subscription packages as they consider breaking their Big Deals. Come hear how Unsub has worked (or not worked!) to inform renewal decisions and negotiations in the real world.

This is a unique panel that includes both the creators of Unsub as well as librarians who have used Unsub in their decision-making.

We will begin with a quick demo of Unsub, then dig into the experiences of the University of Chicago, Iowa State University, and Purdue University. There will be plenty of time to ask questions of Unsub's creators, as well as the academic librarians who have used Unsub's data with their 'Big Deal' renewal/cancellation decisions.

Unsub is open infrastructure, made by the nonprofit Our Research.

Speakers
JH

Jessica Harris

Electronic Resources Management Librarian, University of Chicago
JP

Jason Priem

cofounder, Our Research
avatar for Eric Schares

Eric Schares

Collection Analysis Librarian, Iowa State University


Friday May 21, 2021 3:25pm - 4:25pm EDT
Zoom Room #3

7:00pm EDT

Accessibility and E-Resources: Why it matters to E-Resource Managers, and what you can do.
The degree to which electronic resources meet accessibility standards varies. E-resources that do not meet these standards are not only problematic for users with accessibility needs, but they can also leave institutions vulnerable to legal action. Luckily, there is increasing awareness among librarians and publishers about the importance of e-resource accessibility. Because of this growing awareness, some changes in library workflows are already occurring. E-resource licenses increasingly include accessibility clauses, and accessibility compliance can be indicated in ERM systems, for example. Additionally, many publishers are providing accessibility statements and documentation. This presentation provides basic information about accessibility and e-resources, why it is important, and what actions the have been taken at the presenter’s library toward addressing this important issue.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Zuniga

Heidi Zuniga

Librarian, Colorado State University


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Building community collaboration in the development of a standard
COUNTER is a community of members including libraries, library consortia, vendors and publishers. Together they have collaborated to create the COUNTER Code of Practice and the tools and guides which support it. This session will celebrate that achievement, but also take a practical look at what is required to build relationships across all the stakeholders and to foster collaborative work practices and governance.
As open access drives a change in scholarly communication, needs of all stakeholders will change, and indeed relationships need to be built with new stakeholders, for example, open access publishers and the funders of research. The session will also consider how COUNTER will continue its community collaboration in a time of change.

Speakers
avatar for Ms Lorraine Estelle

Ms Lorraine Estelle

Project Director, COUNTER
Lorraine Estelle is the COUNTER Project Director. Launched in March 2002, COUNTER is an international initiative serving librarians, publishers and intermediaries by setting standards that facilitate the recording and reporting of online usage statistics in a consistent, credible... Read More →


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Documenting an Open Future in a Post-Policy World
Collection development policies have historically outlined precisely what content would be added to academic library collections, in what formats, and with which limitations. A 2019 survey investigated academic librarians’ attitudes, practices, and policies regarding open access (OA), and asked if they write policies to ensure that they approach OA intentionally and systematically. The results indicated that although librarians report favorable beliefs about OA and integrate OA into technical and public services, they seldom create OA policies, or articulate informal understandings of how OA content should be integrated into collections. The lack of OA collection policies may be related to the complexities of OA, but may also be related to a decline of policy writing in academic libraries. This session continues the work of that survey to consider why OA is not documented in collection policies and the implications of this practice for the future integration of OA into library collections.
In order to address the previously mentioned survey’s limitations, including self-selection of survey respondents, and to ensure the diversity of institution types represented, the authors randomly selected 25 institutions from each of the following groups of Carnegie Basic Classifications: Doctoral Universities, Master’s Colleges and Universities, Baccalaureate Colleges and Baccalaureate/Associate’s Colleges, and Associate’s Colleges. The authors emailed a librarian at each of the 100 total institutions a request to complete an enclosed survey, or to forward the survey to the most appropriate person at their institution. The survey collected demographic information related to collections budget, enrollment, and personnel, and asked participants to respond to questions regarding their existing collection development policies, or lack thereof, and whether their policies explicitly address OA content.
The collected responses were analyzed for differences in approaches towards OA collection development practices and policies, with a particular focus on how budget and personnel affected institutional behaviors. The findings surface disparities in the documentation of OA collection practices among institution classifications; how will differences in documentation and practices equip libraries of different kinds to ascend into an open future? After summarizing their findings, the speakers will facilitate a group discussion focusing on the perceived value of policies in participants’ institutional settings, how and why they are documenting OA practices, and what obstacles they have encountered to writing policies for OA. This presentation will frame the OA discussion in such a way that academic librarians from any institution size will find an issue or question to reflect on or engage with. Unlike OA discussions around APCs or institutional repositories, which tend to exclude attendees from smaller libraries, this presentation is inclusive of all.

Speakers
avatar for Caitlin Harrington

Caitlin Harrington

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Memphis
avatar for Rachel E. Scott

Rachel E. Scott

Associate Dean for Information Assets, Illinois State University


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Does COUNTER Release 5 finally give us a level playing field?
COUNTER data is intended to be consistent, credible and comparable, and COUNTER Release 5 introduced four new reporting metrics with that aim in mind: total_item_requests, unique_item_requests, total_item_investigations, and unique_item_investigations. These new measurements allow librarians to compare use across different platforms and finally overcome the shortcomings of previous COUNTER releases where platform design strongly influenced usage statistics often resulting in double counting PDF downloads and HTML views. This presentation will discuss the changes from Release 4 to Release 5 and how the new metrics will enable more robust decision making and comparison across platforms. We will report the results of a study comparing COUNTER 4 and COUNTER 5 usage statistics for a selection of journal subscriptions of an ARL research library. Special emphasis will be placed on investigating the effects of the new reporting metrics, identifying providers most impacted by the changes in metrics, and assessing how much of the double counting in COUNTER 4 was eliminated by the standards change. We will also explain how open access usage data can inform the library in decision making and the impact of the global pandemic on the 2020 usage statistics.

Speakers
avatar for Ms Lorraine Estelle

Ms Lorraine Estelle

Project Director, COUNTER
Lorraine Estelle is the COUNTER Project Director. Launched in March 2002, COUNTER is an international initiative serving librarians, publishers and intermediaries by setting standards that facilitate the recording and reporting of online usage statistics in a consistent, credible... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Imre

Andrea Imre

Electronic Resources Librarian, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Andrea Imre is Electronic Resources Librarian at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.  Her responsibilities include license negotiations, troubleshooting of electronic resource access issues, collecting and analyzing usage statistics, and management of electronic resources in... Read More →


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Emergence of new public discovery services: connecting open web searchers to library content and The digital divide in public libraries' acquisition of electronic resources in the United States
A growing number of new public citation databases, available free of charge and accessible on the open web, are offering researchers a new place to start their searching, providing an alternative to Google Scholar and library resources. These new “public discovery services,” sites such as Semantic Scholar and Meta, index significant portions of scholarly literature, then differentiate themselves by applying technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning to create results sets which are promoted as more meaningful, easier to navigate and more engaging than other discovery options.

Additionally, these new public discovery services are adding new linking technologies that connect researchers from citation records to full text content licensed on their behalf by their affiliated libraries. This linking is often seamless so it may not always be obvious to end users that access is enabled by their library.

With these new sites logging millions of sessions a month, they present unique opportunities for libraries to connect to researchers working outside the library and challenges in making how the library can make itself obvious in the user workflow.

This presentation will provide an overview of the new public discovery services, describe the mechanisms to link to full text, and discuss the implications for libraries.


Speakers
avatar for Kendall Bartsch

Kendall Bartsch

CEO, Third Iron
Kendall Bartsch is the co-founder and CEO of Third Iron who works with an amazing team to deliver BrowZine and LibKey to over 1,200 libraries around the world. Third Iron services deliver next-generation solutions that simplify and improve access to content, all while keeping the... Read More →


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Factoring OA into the Big Deal
In 2020, the State University of New York (SUNY) decreased their consortial Elsevier journal package from nearly 2,000 titles to 248. Data from tools such as Unsub, as well as COUNTER reports that describe open access (OA) use, factored into this decision-making process._x000D_

This session will explore how data about OA article availability, as well as use of OA articles, can help libraries make informed decisions about library collections and subscriptions.

Speakers
avatar for Esta Tovstiadi (they/them)

Esta Tovstiadi (they/them)

Shared Collections Coordinator, SUNY Library Services


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Implementing FOLIO at Duke University Libraries to Manage Electronic Resource Licenses
This presentation will be a firsthand account of the implementation of the Licenses and Organizations apps in the FOLIO open source library services platform at Duke University Libraries. The presenters will highlight preparatory work, communication with colleagues, putting together an implementation team, stages of implementation work, document management, and experiences managing licenses for electronic resources in the FOLIO ERM apps now that they are live.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Brannon

Julie Brannon

IT Business Analyst, Duke University
avatar for Virginia Martin

Virginia Martin

Head, Continuing Resource Acquisitions, Duke University Libraries
Virginia Martin is Head, Continuing Resource Acquisitions Department at Duke University Libraries. 
avatar for Abigail Wickes she/her/hers

Abigail Wickes she/her/hers

Electronic Resources Management Librarian, Duke University Libraries
Electronic Resources Management Librarian at Duke University Libraries. I cut my teeth in scholarly publishing doing content discovery management at OUP.


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Jumping in Midstream: How an Newly-Appointed Serials Librarian Discovered Her Print Collection Carrying out a print serials inventory: getting from wishlist to action
Jumping in Midstream: How an Newly-Appointed Serials Librarian Discovered Her Print Collection - This program will demonstrate how a newly-appointed serials/e-resources librarian began her new job at St. Leo University without any published guidelines--it will discuss step-by-step methods on how she discovered her new collection, peeling it back like an onion, to revise, reorganize and revitalize. Her overall goal was to make the collection easier to locate and utilize.
Carrying out a print serials inventory: getting from wishlist to action - As those in the serials community know, managing print serials can be a different beast compared to its monographic cousins and inventorying holdings across multiple locations is no exception. After many years of being on a to-do wishlist and several months of planning, a full scale inventory to verify the print serials holdings within the Tarleton State University Dick Smith Library current stacks and its offsite storage location commenced February 2020. The inventory aims to enhance the library’s catalog and OCLC local holdings records by clarifying available title and coverage; check the health of the print collection by isolating or removing damaged volumes; and record an accurate total number of bound units as reported within the annual ACRL Academic Library Trends and Statistics survey. In this presentation, the Manager of the Electronic Resources & Scholarly Communication department shares details on carrying out a multi-part approach to a print serials inventory project that includes training, inventory assignments, and progress tracking. The training portion covers how student workers and staff are prepared to check each item manually and record holdings data in person; the inventory assignments portion covers how the project was portioned out and the quality control layers developed to ensure accuracy of recorded holdings data as it makes its way to the catalog and OCLC local holdings records; and the progress tracking portion discusses the management of all parts of the inventory in the midst of challenges such as lack of functional barcodes, staff changes, and fluctuating time commitments.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Castillo

Amy Castillo

Manager of E-Resources and Scholarly Communication, Tarleton State University
AK

Audrey Koke

St. Leo University


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Loving Statistics and Excel Fuzzy Lookup in the time of COVID-19
In spring 2020, many academic libraries closed their buildings mid-semester due to the COVID-19 pandemic, making their physical collections abruptly unavailable. Even after reopening, much of the education at North American colleges and universities took place online, depopulating campuses. How did this situation affect the use of libraries’ electronic collections? What differences can we observe in how students and faculty discovered, accessed and used electronic resources in 2020 due to the pandemic? Which resources, if any, received the biggest increase in use as a result of the change in availability of library materials? Which changes in use patterns persisted even after the reopening of library buildings? How did we pull these information together? We used Excel’s Fuzzy Lookup to create unique reports from information spread across multiple platforms’ statistics. This presentation will explore Eresources usage during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as how to use the easy Fuzzy Lookup function to merge data.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Fry

Amy Fry

E-Resources Management Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Ebooks, usage statistics
avatar for Jamie Gieseck-Ashworth

Jamie Gieseck-Ashworth

Account Services Manager, EBSCO Information Services
Jamie Gieseck-Ashworth has been an Account Services Manager (a.k.a. EBSCO traveling librarian) since 2012. She received her MLS from Kent State University in 2000. Jamie worked for 5 different OhioLINK libraries, both academic and medical, for over 14 years. Her duties covered... Read More →
avatar for Carol Seiler

Carol Seiler

Account Services Manager, EBSCO Information Services
Carol Seiler started her career in libraries as a cataloger and has worked in almost all areas of the library. She has primarily worked as an academic/medical librarian but has also served at a public library and as a technical services trainer with a consortium. Carol has been with... Read More →



Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

OER Publishing and Libraries
This session explores current library OER publishing practices and presents the results of research done on those practices. This original research surveyed academic librarians involved in OER publication projects and expands on previously published case studies, such as Santiago and Ray’s (2020) Navigating Support Models for OER Publishing. In their publication, Santiago and Ray concluded “Given that there are relatively few established models to guide academic libraries in supporting OER publishing, more dialogue and the development of best practices are needed in this area. In particular, best practices are needed for how to balance the complexities of supporting publishing in an open landscape with the urgency of addressing textbook affordability”. Our study will begin to address some of these concerns.
The presenters will compile this research as a set of best practices, which will be openly licensed. The ultimate goal is to collect a broad picture of current practices, share examples of practices that work, and create a template with elements other librarians who lead or plan to lead publishing initiatives can adopt or adapt for use at their institutions. Author recruitment, publishing tools and platforms, publishing support outside the library, publishing workflows, and publishing program documentation and standards will all be addressed. The presenters also explore awareness and use of OER and Library publishing toolkits and guides.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer L. Pate

Jennifer L. Pate

Open Educational Resources & ScholCom Librarian, University of North Alabama
ET

Elaine Thornton

Open Education & Distance Learning Librarian, University of Arkansas


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Student Use of Library-Provided Materials: Citation Analysis across 3 Fields of Study and Using Local Citation Analysis for Improving Serials Collections
One of the tools that collection managers can use to guide selection and retention is citation analysis. Although time-consuming to collect and analyze, citations by library users provide compelling evidence for keeping certain titles or growing collection support for specific subject areas, and may provide a good sense of which materials may be safely weeded. Citation analysis can also give an indication of how well the collection is meeting the needs of the students of the home institution. Researchers at East Carolina University reviewed nearly 23,000 citations from 171 doctoral dissertations written by candidates in three programs: Education, English, and Kinesiology. The study focused on library-provided access to journals and books and the format and ages of these items. We were also interested in titles that were cited by more than one author and across disciplines. Our research confirms that the library provides substantial electronic journal coverage and somewhat less satisfactory monograph availability. There are short-term and long-term implications for collection development and management at our institution, including review of our serials subscriptions, print holdings, and backfile purchases, as well as distribution of ebook purchases versus print book purchases. Future research on the impact of open access is suggested, and the researchers are also interested in the methods that dissertation authors are using to access materials.
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Faced with new or expanding programs, electronic resources and serials librarians want to anticipate and address gaps in their serials collections. At the same time, scholarly communications librarians want to better understand emerging faculty research areas for promotion and outreach efforts. Working together and combining collection assessment techniques and bibliometrics can provide the library with useful insights.
Local citation analysis provides an additional metric for librarians to consider in serials collection development. The results of these local citation analyses often help librarians to identify core journal sets or identify gaps in their library’s serials collections. Additionally, this analysis can uncover new faculty research areas and trends for scholarly communications outreach and education.
This presentation will share methods for conducting a local citation analysis using Scopus and comparing the results to the library’s holdings. It will also detail the presenters’ efforts to streamline the process to make it part of their routine collection analysis.
The presenters will also share a case study of how their institution used a local citation analysis to improve collections in the areas of nursing and health sciences to help meet the needs of new and fast-growing programs. Having generated a list of unsubscribed titles cited by the institution’s researchers, they will incorporate other metrics and subscription costs to determine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adding titles to the library’s collection. Additionally, by examining faculty’s publications and cited sources, the presenters will explore faculty research trends for promotion and outreach opportunities.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew J. Jabaily

Matthew J. Jabaily

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Kraemer Family Library, University of Colorado Colorado Springs
avatar for Susan Vandagriff

Susan Vandagriff

Scholarly Communications Librarian, UCCS Kraemer Family Library
avatar for Wm. Joseph Thomas

Wm. Joseph Thomas

East Carolina University



Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

Usability Studies in the Electronic Resource Life Cycle
A number of studies investigate the usability of library websites, but usability is less commonly associated with the electronic resource life cycle. The usability of a website or electronic resource is a combination of several factors, including “intuitive design, ease of learning, efficiency of use, memorability, error frequency/severity, and subject satisfaction” and may be measured using a variety of quantitative and qualitative approaches (https://www.usability.gov/what-and-why/usability-evaluation.html). Through usability testing, websites or electronic resources are evaluated by actual or potential users of the resources. Testing can include various methods but it commonly involves users attempting to complete tasks while being observed by researchers. During observations, researchers can ask open-ended questions to gain an idea of how users feel about the ease of use of the website or resource being evaluated. Usability influences library patrons’ use and satisfaction with electronic resources and services which in turn affects library employees’ acquisition, provision of access, administration, support, and evaluation of electronic resources. Librarians may integrate usability into the electronic resource life cycle in a variety of places and using numerous methods. This presentation will provide an introduction to usability testing, discuss a usability case study of EBSCO’s Curriculum Builder, and highlight examples of how librarians might fruitfully incorporate usability methods into the electronic resource lifecycle.

Speakers
avatar for Kenneth Haggerty

Kenneth Haggerty

University of Memphis
avatar for Caitlin Harrington

Caitlin Harrington

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Memphis
avatar for Rachel E. Scott

Rachel E. Scott

Associate Dean for Information Assets, Illinois State University


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

What Do You Do When the Library is Closed? Measuring User Satisfaction with Library Collections & Services during COVID-19
Like many academic libraries, the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries quickly shifted its services to support remote learning, instruction, and research in response to COVID-19. In March 2020, the University Libraries, which includes a main library and four branch locations, closed to the public and fully transitioned its services such as reference and research support to an online environment, and pivoted collection development to primarily acquire e-resources. In addition, the libraries invested in streaming videos, acquired several new eBook packages, and took advantage of offers from vendors for extended trials or complimentary access to electronic resources.

Several key services were discontinued or modified; physical stacks in all library locations were closed, and access to materials and study spaces were limited to seat reservations and contactless pickup, and print course reserves were suspended. Additionally, the pandemic limited the Libraries’ ability to borrow, lend, purchase, and catalog physical materials, and the economic fallout led to budget cuts that resulted in resource cancellations.
This was a dramatic change in operations that altered the way faculty and students interacted with the Libraries and we wanted to understand how these changes impacted our users. This session will present findings from a survey of library users designed to measure user expectations and satisfaction in three main areas: 1) use of physical library spaces & materials, 2) access to and use of e-resources, 3) modified library services like contactless pickup and course reserves. The research objective is to understand user expectations of academic library services during the pandemic and how recent adjustments to library services & collections affected user satisfaction.
These findings, along with supplemental data from usage statistics and feedback forms, will be used to identify library services that are essential for learning, research, and instruction and prioritize library services that best meet user expectations for next academic year.

Speakers
avatar for Arthur Aguilera

Arthur Aguilera

Collection Analyst Librarian, University of Colorado Boulder
avatar for Gabrielle Wiersma

Gabrielle Wiersma

Director of Scholarly Resource Development, University of Colorado Boulder


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)

7:00pm EDT

‘Opening the Future’ A new funding model for open-access monographs: introducing an innovative approach to publishing OA books through library membership funding
We outline the work of a university press, with assistance from the COPIM Project (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs), in launching an innovative revenue model to fund open access monographs at a traditional scholarly publisher. Building on library subscription models, we present a sustainable OA publishing model that gives library members access to a highly-regarded backlist, with the revenue then used to make the frontlist openly accessible.

Given the current global library environment and existing budget pressures that have been exacerbated by Covid-19, a consortial model of funding promises a cost-effective solution for OA that means no single institution bears a disproportionate burden. This model, then, appeals to both those who wish to pay for subscription-access content (more traditional university acquisition models) and those who support OA initiatives. It brings many institutions together under one roof for an affordable route to open-access books.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Paul Eve

Martin Paul Eve

Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing, Birkbeck, University of London
Martin Paul Eve is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London. He has been a steering-group member of the OAPEN-UK project, the Jisc National Monograph Strategy Group, the SCONUL Strategy Group on Academic Content and Communications, and the... Read More →
avatar for Tom Grady

Tom Grady

Scholarly Publishing Outreach, COPIM & Opening the Future


Friday May 21, 2021 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
On Demand (pre-recorded)
 
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